Noteworthy Information
How the Trump Campaign’s Mobile App Is Collecting Huge Amounts of Voter Data

The New Yorker on the mobile app for Donald Trump’s reëlection campaign, which was developed by the ad broker and software company Phunware, and how it gathers users’ data in an invasive way reminiscent of the methods of Cambridge Analytica.

Portland Passes Groundbreaking Ban on Facial Recognition in Stores, Banks, Restaurants and More

Amid sometimes violent protests and counter-protests around racial justice, this week Portland, Oregon legislators unanimously passed groundbreaking new legislation to ban the use of facial recognition technology, which some see as a victory for civil rights and digital justice. The ban covers use of the technology in both privately owned places as well as by city agencies. Another story reports that Amazon spent $24.000 to kill Portland's facial recognition ban.

Ireland To Order Facebook To Stop Sending User Data To US

A European Union privacy regulator has sent Facebook a preliminary order to suspend data transfers to the U.S. about its EU users, WSJ reported Wednesday, citing people familiar with the matter, an operational and legal challenge for the company that could set a precedent for other tech giants.

Cellphone Data Shows How Las Vegas Is “Gambling With Lives” Across the US

Las Vegas casinos, open for months now, are a likely hotbed for the spread of COVID-19. For many reasons, contact tracing has proved next to impossible as tourists return to homes across the U.S.

CJEU invalidates “Privacy Shield” in US Surveillance case

The EU's Court of Justice has just invalidated the "Privacy Shield" data sharing system between the EU and the US, because of overreaching US surveillance.

Minnesota is now using contact tracing to track protestors

Minnesota officials say they’re using contact tracing to better understand who the protestors are and where they’re coming from.

HHS publishes final regs on info blocking, interoperability

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has finalized two long-awaited sets of rules that will govern how providers, payers and technology vendors must design their systems to give patients safe and secure access to their digital health data.

California’s new privacy law, explained

The California Consumer Privacy Act gives Californians some control over their data, but only if they know how to take advantage of it.

EU court boost for activist in Facebook data transfer fight

EU regulators must make more effort to stop tech companies from transferring data to countries with weaker data-protection standards, an advisor to the European Union’s top court said Thursday. It’s the latest in a lengthy and complex legal case involving an Austrian privacy campaigner and Facebook.

I Took DNA Tests in the U.S. and China. The Results Concern Me

Privacy is big question, as governments seek access to DNA data.

2020 Democrats on who controls your data — and who’s at fault when it’s mishandled

Your quick rundown to US politics and data rights: Presidential candidates agree that americans should have more control over their data than they do now.

We will find you: DNA search can home in on about 60% of white Americans

If you’re white, live in the United States, and a distant relative has uploaded their DNA to a public ancestry database, there’s a good chance an internet sleuth can identify you from a DNA sample you left somewhere.

Recommendations on the Ethical Use of Artificial Intelligence by the Department of Defense

The United States Department of Defense (DoD) enduring challenge is to retain a technological and military advantage while upholding and promoting democratic values, working with our allies, and contributing to a stable, peaceful international community. DoD’s development and use of artificial intelligence (AI) reflects this challenge.
The Defense Innovation Board (DIB) recommends five AI ethics principles for adoption by DoD, which in shorthand are: responsible, equitable, traceable, reliable, and governable. These principles and a set of recommended actions in support of them are described in this document.

New Privacy Bill In The U.S. Will Now Jail CEOs Who Lie About User Data

US Senator Ron Wyden has come out with a radical new privacy bill that will prevent tech giants from selling and misusing data by holding them accountable.

Data Ownership in the US Elections

Andrew Yang (2020 US Presidential Candidate from the Democrats): Our data is ours - or it should be. At this point our data is more valuable than oil. If anyone benefits from our data it should be us. I would make data a property right that each of us shares.

Can You Put a Price on Your Personal Data?

A US senator wants to oblige big tech to declare to users how much they make with personal data.


Questions Asked
US vs Europe: Difference in City Data use?

I met the Communication Officer for UN Technology Innovation Lab Finland, Dorn Townsend, who is planning to write a story to New York Times and World Economic Forum and he asks: “... I’m trying to understand why North American cities use aggregated social data for city planning whereas it hasn’t caught on so much here, and was wondering if it’s because of the new digital privacy laws ... If you have any articles you'd recommend I’d be grateful.”