Noteworthy Information

Individuals Simple read

Exercise your digital rights and find out what your data is used for

Your data is more valuable than you might think. You have the right to know how your data is used. Get started by asking five questions of the companies whose digital services you use.

Business & Government Intermediate read

Europe fit for the Digital Age: Commission proposes new rules and actions for excellence and trust in Artificial Intelligence

The Commission proposes today new rules and actions aiming to turn Europe into the global hub for trustworthy Artificial Intelligence (AI). The combination of the first-ever legal framework on AI and a new Coordinated Plan with Member States will guarantee the safety and fundamental rights of people and businesses, while strengthening AI uptake, investment and innovation across the EU. New rules on Machinery will complement this approach by adapting safety rules to increase users' trust in the new, versatile generation of products.

Individuals Advanced read

Digital Services Act: A Game Changer for our Fundamental Rights? (Recording, 1:37 hours)

With the Digital Services Act (DSA), the European Union is to adopt landmark legislation that will create a framework to regulate online platforms around the world. This event hosted by MEP Patrick Breyer brought together experts from the European Parliament, the European Commission, the Fundamental Rights Agency and civil society.

Business & Government Advanced read

GDPR Data Portability: The Forgotten Right

Europe has some of the most advanced data rights in the world, and yet in practice, it is almost impossible to access and move one’s individual data in a useful way. European citizens and businesses can co-create value and strengthen local economies if they can move their data between services. This overview discusses current challenges and proposes 10 solutions to improve data portability in 2021.

[Intermediate] The EU should regulate AI on the basis of rights, not risks

In only a few months the European Commission is set to present a regulation on artificial intelligence (AI). Despite numerous statements from civil society and other actors about the dangers of applying a risk-based approach to regulating AI, the European Commission seems determined to go in this direction. The Commission already said in its 2020 White Paper on Artificial Intelligence that it wanted to apply a risk-based approach.

However, a risk-based approach to regulation is not adequate to protect human rights. Our rights are non-negotiable and they must be respected regardless of a risk level associated with external factors.

[Simple] Gig economy workers score historic digital rights victory against Uber and Ola Cabs

A group of UK drivers and a driver from Portugal have won a historic victory in their legal battle for greater transparency of algorithmic management practices used by Uber and Ola Cabs. The drivers were seeking to access their personal data from Ola and Uber as well as the right to transparency to algorithmic management. The cases were taken before the Amsterdam District Court as both Ola and Uber control driver data from the Netherlands.

[Simple] “Nutrition Label” for Health-Tech Security and Data Rights Practices

Connected sensors for at-home healthcare require a novel kind of risk-benefit analysis, and we teamed up with Carnegie Mellon researchers to make a new label.

[Intermediate] Scientists pushing for 'neuro-rights'

Scientific advances from deep brain stimulation to wearable scanners are making manipulation of the human mind increasingly possible, creating a need for laws and protections to regulate use of the new tools.

Andrew Yang proposes that your digital data be considered personal property

Data generated by each individual needs to be owned by them, with certain rights conveyed that will allow them to know how it’s used and protect it.

vs.

Making your digital self personal property makes as much sense as making your physical self personal property. That road does NOT end well.

Human rights in the digital age

Keynote speech by Michelle Bachelet, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights at Japan Society, New York, 17 October 2019

The digital revolution is a major global human rights issue. Its unquestionable benefits do not cancel out its unmistakable risks.

People First: A Vision for the Global Urban Age

The People-first vision is a new perspective to how cities can govern and benefit from digital technologies in the global urban age, by developing people’s rights and technologies in harmony.

2020 Democrats on who controls your data — and who’s at fault when it’s mishandled

Your quick rundown to US politics and data rights: Presidential candidates agree that americans should have more control over their data than they do now.

Fighting for digital equity, in Canada and beyond

Equitable access to the internet is a communication right. As the Alliance for Affordable Internet (A4AI) points out, not only is the internet a pathway to information, communication, and economic opportunity, it is increasingly necessary to access basic commercial and public services. As more of the world becomes digital, those unable to connect will inevitably be left behind.

1st Reading Club Took Place

This week the first reading club was held on Thursday and a number of interesting things were posted subsequently: @Fredrik Löfman posted an Economis article (Is Google an evil genius?) and an interesting article series on data-rights related issues. @Antti 'Jogi' Poikola proposed to read and discuss Laron Lanier, Ten Arguments for Deleting Your Social Media Accounts Right Now next.

Data Protection and Digital Agency for Refugees

For the millions of refugees fleeing conflict and persecution every year, access to information about their rights and control over their personal data are crucial for their ability to assess risk and navigate the asylum process. While asylum seekers are required to provide significant amounts of personal information on their journey to safety, they are rarely fully informed of their data rights by UN agencies or local border control and law enforcement staff tasked with obtaining and processing their personal information. Despite recent improvements in data protection mechanisms in the European Union, refugees’ informed consent for the collection and use of their personal data is rarely sought.


Questions Asked

MyData Global at RightsCon

A punch of people from MyData Global will be at RightsCon in Tunis, Tunisia next week and Teemu asked to retweet RightsCon-related tweets!


Tools
Cities for Digital Rights

To protect and uphold digital rights at the local and global level