Welcome to the MyData Weekly Digest, a news site dedicated to producing the best coverage from within the human centred approach in personal data management... show more >>

To receive the Weekly Digest by email: Subscribe

Noteworthy Information

Individuals Simple read

TheirCharts

If you’re getting health care in the U.S., chances are your providers are now trying to give you a better patient experience through a website called MyChart. This is supposed to be yours, as the first person singular pronoun My implies. Problem is, it’s TheirChart. And there are a lot of them.

Individuals Intermediate read

DeFi Gives Financial Privacy — Will Regulation Take It Away?

May the government restrict DeFi (decentralized finance) tools, and force people to use third-party intermediaries, precisely to take advantage of the extra surveillance power that the third-party doctrine would provide? This question has taken on added importance in the context of emerging web3 technologies, with implications for coders, customers, and entrepreneurs.

Developers Simple read

Decades of Research: the Story of How mRNA Vaccines Were Developed

The stunning Covid vaccines manufactured by Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna drew upon long-buried discoveries made in the hopes of ending past epidemics. Even as the Omicron variant fuels a new wave of the pandemic, the vaccines have proved remarkably resilient at defending against severe illness and death. And the manufacturers, Pfizer, BioNTech and Moderna, say that mRNA technology will allow them to adapt the vaccines quickly, to fend off whatever dangerous new version of the virus that evolution brings next.

Individuals Simple read

Meta faces billion-pound class-action case

Up to 44 million UK Facebook users could share £2.3bn in damages, according to a competition expert intending to sue parent company Meta.

Business & Government Intermediate read

Google, Amazon, Meta and Microsoft Weave a Fiber-Optic Web of Power

To say that Big Tech controls the internet might seem like an exaggeration. Increasingly, in at least one sense, it's literally true: The internet can seem intangible, a post-physical environment where things like viral posts, virtual goods and metaverse concerts just sort of happen. But creating that illusion requires a truly gargantuan -- and quickly-growing -- web of physical connections. Fiber-optic cable, which carries 95% of the world's international internet traffic, links up pretty much all of the world's data centers, those vast server warehouses where the computing happens that transforms all those 1s and 0s into our experience of the internet. Where those fiber-optic connections link up countries across the oceans, they consist almost entirely of cables running underwater -- some 1.3 million kilometers (or more than 800,000 miles) of bundled glass threads that make up the actual, physical international internet. And until recently, the overwhelming majority of the undersea fiber-optic cable being installed was controlled and used by telecommunications companies and governments. Today, that's no longer the case.

Business & Government Intermediate read

The Future of International Data Transfers (paper, 25p)

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) contains a blanket prohibition on the transfer of personal data outside of the European Economic Area (EEA) unless strict requirements are met. The rationale for this provision is to protect personal data and data subject rights by restricting data transfers to countries that may not have the same level of protection as the EEA. However, the ubiquitous and permeable character of new technologies such as cloud computing, and the increased inter-connectivity between societies, has made international data transfers the norm and not the exception. The Schrems II case and subsequent regulatory developments have further raised the bar for companies to comply with complex and, often, opaque rules.

Business & Government Simple read

WhatsApp Ordered To Help US Agents Spy On Chinese Phones

U.S. federal agencies have been using a 35-year-old American surveillance law to secretly track WhatsApp users with no explanation as to why and without knowing whom they are targeting. In Ohio, a just-unsealed government surveillance application reveals that in November 2021, DEA investigators demanded the Facebook-owned messaging company track seven users based in China and Macau. The application reveals the DEA didn't know the identities of any of the targets, but told WhatsApp to monitor the IP addresses and numbers with which the targeted users were communicating, as well as when and how they were using the app. Such surveillance is done using a technology known as a pen register and under the 1986 Pen Register Act, and doesn't seek any message content, which WhatsApp couldn't provide anyway, as it is end-to-end encrypted.

Business & Government Simple read

A tale of personal data, trust and consent

Eurocities is the network of more than 200 cities in 38 countries, representing 130 million people. Here is a story on a project from Finland with MyData.

Business & Government Intermediate read

Red Cross Begs Hackers Not To Leak Data of 'Highly Vulnerable People'

The Red Cross has disclosed that it was the victim of a cyber attack and has asked the hackers who broke into the IT network of one of its contractors not to leak the personal information of more than 515,000 of "highly vulnerable people."

To receive the Weekly Digest by email:

You can cancel the subscription anytime with a single click at the end of every mail. We will not spam you!